Meadows In The Mountains Remains A Bulgarian Beacon

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The global festival scene is both buoyant and abundant. Shining above the thousands of annual parties that are often lavished with massive production budgets is this Bulgarian music festival, which is set 850 metres above sea-level – above every other festival. Meadows in the Mountains have managed to define their niche from the very beginning, offering a boutique-styled festival based upon a communal vibe whilst keeping a carefully manicured capacity. This allows their defining ethos of friends, family, love, music, and nature to shine through.

Creating a social experimental adventure for festival goers in preference to the usual A-list driven European alternates has produced an ever-loyal following of free thinkers and awarded the team a stream of vibrant supportive press since inception a solid six years ago. It continues to evolve and excite annually; Meadows in the Mountains has engaged the Bulgarian government bringing much needed localised trade, the building of permanent community structures harnessing eco technologies and enforcing a sustainable green trademark.

If you are looking to spread your festival wings then look no further than one of the friendliest essential escapes for 2017. Embracing underground artists and unheard talent across a multitude of areas caressed by wildlife and fauna. According to legend, The Rhodope Mountains was originally home to the Greek mythological singer Orpheus. Historically, the country has been conquered by the Roman Empire, Genghis Khan, and Alexander The Great; experience the amazing country of Bulgaria, high up in the mountains, with the music you need to hear. We suggest you buy direct flights to join the MITM family and rewrite your perception of the perfect party.

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About Author

Jonathan Currinn is an accomplished writer, journalist, author and blogger. Graduating from Staffordshire University in 2015 he is relatively young but already a seasoned editor of note, fulfilling content for many great publications and now Electric Mode.

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